People

Ed Ames

Ed Ames

Born in Malden, Massachusetts on July 9, 1927, Edmond Dantes Urick became a successful singer and actor, known to us as Ed Ames. Joining with four of his brothers to form the Armory Brothers singing group, named after brother Vic’s middle name, they were very popular as amatuers, but would not go professional until they finished school. The brothers toured military bases and eventually performed at the “Fox’s and Hound’s” in Boston, a very popular upscale club. The group’s name was shortened to the Ames Brothers and they became one of the most popular quartets of the late 40s and 50s.

The Ames Brothers were multilingual, being able to read or speak six languages. This came in handy for their LP “Hello, Italy.” Among their hits were, “Forever and Ever,” “Rag Mop,” “Sentimental Me,” and “It Must Be True.” The advent of Rock and Roll decreased the popularity of the group’s style of singing and in the early 60s, Ed left the group to study acting.

During the next two years, Ed did not sing, devoting his time to his new acting career. Appearing in Broadway and Off-Broadway productions like, “The Crucible,” “The Fantastics,” and “Carnival,” Ed was noticed by Hollywood, especially his performance in, “One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest.” “Cuckoos Nest,” brought the opportunity to work with Fess Parker in the tv series, “Daniel Boone.” Co-starring as Mingo, the Oxford educated Cherokee brave, Ed’s character became Boone’s friend and companion during the four year run of the series from ’64-’68. Some of the other plays Ed performed in were “South Pacific,” “Man of La Mancha,” “Fiddler on the Roof,” “Shenandoah,” “Camelot,” “Carousel,” and “Romeo and Juliet.”

Ed Ames was a quite popular guest on several TV shows. After resuming his singing career, he appeared on Johnny Carson and was so popular he was brought back to sing a different song every night for a week. And in a hilarious turn of events on the Carson show of April 29, 1965, Ed caused the audience to laugh longer than any other incident in live tv. It turns out that Johnny wanted Ed to demonstrate his tomahawk throwing expertise, gained through his time on the “Daniel Boone” tv series. A full size target of a man was placed on stage and Ed took aim and through the tomahawk. Unfortunately, it lodged directly in the targets groin. Johnny and the audience burst out in laughter and then Johnny followed with, “I didn’t even know you were Jewish.”

During the 60s, Ed Ames finally had his first major solo hit in, “Try To Remember.” Other hits in the 60s included, “Time, Time, Time,” “My Cup Runneth Over,” and “Who Will Answer.” Ed had been a regular on Arthur Godfrey’s show and Ed Sullivan’s first show, “Toast of the Town.”

In the 90s, Ed finally achieved his lifelong dream of owning a ranch. He raises paints and Quarter horses at his Utah ranch and has three children from his first marriage. In 1998, he married Jeanne Arnold, formerly one of his opening acts when he sang solo shows. Ed Ames continues to perform occasionally.

Check Also

Close
Close